sexpigeon:

Here is a nice-seeming couple that is doing everything wrong. Each taking up a seat-and-a-half rather than scooching into single-seat positions. Some brave jerk is going to come and correct them, wave his hands and cock his head in such a way as to compact this twosome and earn a seat. That jerk. These dips.

This is the ambient anger of city things. I don’t know what the ambient anger of suburban things looks like (parking spaces?) or of rural things (fences? how dull). But here is an everyday bristle of New York City in 2014. Do with it what you will.

npr:

The NY Train Project allows people to “travel one of New York’s often overlooked treasures, the New York City subway.”
Art director/designer Adam Chang created the online gallery of tiles in subway stations after noticing the intricate details of the signs. 
According to the project’s website, he has spent 20 hours riding and waiting on trains, swiped his card nine times and covered 118 stations. 
"I hope this gallery can serve as not only a tribute to the history of the subway stations but also as a quick guide to getting around New York via the MTA," writes Chang. 
(h/t to Transportation Nation)
— Lauren Katz  npr:

The NY Train Project allows people to “travel one of New York’s often overlooked treasures, the New York City subway.”
Art director/designer Adam Chang created the online gallery of tiles in subway stations after noticing the intricate details of the signs. 
According to the project’s website, he has spent 20 hours riding and waiting on trains, swiped his card nine times and covered 118 stations. 
"I hope this gallery can serve as not only a tribute to the history of the subway stations but also as a quick guide to getting around New York via the MTA," writes Chang. 
(h/t to Transportation Nation)
— Lauren Katz  npr:

The NY Train Project allows people to “travel one of New York’s often overlooked treasures, the New York City subway.”
Art director/designer Adam Chang created the online gallery of tiles in subway stations after noticing the intricate details of the signs. 
According to the project’s website, he has spent 20 hours riding and waiting on trains, swiped his card nine times and covered 118 stations. 
"I hope this gallery can serve as not only a tribute to the history of the subway stations but also as a quick guide to getting around New York via the MTA," writes Chang. 
(h/t to Transportation Nation)
— Lauren Katz  npr:

The NY Train Project allows people to “travel one of New York’s often overlooked treasures, the New York City subway.”
Art director/designer Adam Chang created the online gallery of tiles in subway stations after noticing the intricate details of the signs. 
According to the project’s website, he has spent 20 hours riding and waiting on trains, swiped his card nine times and covered 118 stations. 
"I hope this gallery can serve as not only a tribute to the history of the subway stations but also as a quick guide to getting around New York via the MTA," writes Chang. 
(h/t to Transportation Nation)
— Lauren Katz 

npr:

The NY Train Project allows people to “travel one of New York’s often overlooked treasures, the New York City subway.”

Art director/designer Adam Chang created the online gallery of tiles in subway stations after noticing the intricate details of the signs. 

According to the project’s website, he has spent 20 hours riding and waiting on trains, swiped his card nine times and covered 118 stations. 

"I hope this gallery can serve as not only a tribute to the history of the subway stations but also as a quick guide to getting around New York via the MTA," writes Chang. 

(h/t to Transportation Nation)

Lauren Katz 

nycworkforce1:

Mayor Bill de Blasio Announces Tech Talent Pipeline to Kick off Internet Week

We’re excited to share that Mayor Bill de Blasio announced the creation of the NYC Tech Talent Pipeline during his keynote address at Internet Week New York this morning.

The NYC Tech Talent Pipeline will support the growth of the tech sector and train New Yorkers to be tech companies’ first choices for hiring. Building on an existing relationship with CUNY and the NYC Department of Education, the NYC Department of Small Business Services will lead this effort based on its long-standing relationships with employers, and deep investment in worker training.

The NYC Tech Talent Pipeline combines city, federal, and private dollars to reach a budget of approximately $10M, distributed across 3 years. It will be supported by several philanthropic partners, including inaugural funder J.P. Morgan Chase, The New York Community Trust, and the NYC Workforce Funders, who are committing to future funding.


Photo Credit: Diana Robinson for the Office of Mayor Bill de Blasio

Training more New Yorkers for high-demand jobs in the tech industry = a win for everyone.

putthison:

I really enjoyed reading on Uni-Watch about Cleveland Indians diehards who’ve removed the ethnic caricature Chief Wahoo from their Indians gear. Some remove it perfectly, some leave the evidence of the removal behind - a sort of ghost. It reminds me of the silhouettes of slave life incorporated into the now-closed National Slavery Museum. Just as folks who acknowledge the legacy of slavery don’t love their homes any less, these folks still love their team, even if they don’t love this grotesque symbol.

Certainly a lesson about the power of clothing.

english2english:

- Martin Pengelly

If I had my druthers, Americans would stop saying ‘if I had my druthers’.

You will, of course, have seen what I did there. And so there might seem little point in my carrying on to write: ‘What is/are ‘druthers’ and why would one wish to have it/them?

I asked this on…

The word “druthers” just makes me cringe.

By day, he’s just an average, mild-mannered man named Mr. Mobley. But when the sun goes down, he becomes… MR. SHAMPOO.

humansofnewyork:

I struck up a conversation with him, and he casually mentioned that he was having trouble adjusting to Columbia, due to his “previous situation.” So I asked him to elaborate.

"I was born in Egypt," he said. "I worked on a farm until 3rd grade with no education. I came to the US for one year, started 4th grade, but was pulled out because my father couldn’t find work and returned to Egypt for a year. The first time I went to an actual school was middle school, but the whole school was in one classroom, and I was working as a delivery boy to help the family. It was illegal for me to be working that young, but I did. When I finally got into high school, my house burned down. We moved into a Red Cross Shelter, and the only way we could live there is if we all worked as volunteers. I got through high school by watching every single video on Khan Academy, and teaching myself everything that I had missed during the last nine years. Eventually I got into Queens College. I went there for two years and I just now transferred to Columbia on a scholarship provided by the New York Housing Association for people who live in the projects. It’s intimidating, because everyone else who goes to Columbia went to the best schools, and have had the best education their entire lives."

I watched this man—decked out in Yankees attire with a Yankees handbag—dance around, smile and wave at passersby for at least 20 minutes. Every so often, he paused to take a swig of Budweiser from the rather large can at his feet. Eventually, a nearby shopkeeper shooed him away.

New Yorkers Aren’t Rude. You Are.

johnskylar:

And I mean that title with the utmost of respect.

I’ve been a denizen of this fair[ly crappy] city my entire life, in one way or another.  I spent some time in LA during college, but don’t worry, I got over it.  The one thing, though, that I’ve consistently heard from around the US is that New York is a rude city.

This is, I feel, based on a fundamental misunderstanding of what this place is.  

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I think the Five Guys comment board is starting to go off the rails.